Norway’s male and female footballers sign historic equal-pay agreement

The women’s team will receive a pay rise of 2.5 million kroner (£225,651) meaning that, as of next year, both sides will now be paid six million kroner (£541,823) each –  via – the independent 

Norway’s footballers have signed an equal-pay agreement that will see all international senior male and female players paid the same wages.

The women’s team will receive a pay rise of 2.5 million kroner (£225,651) meaning that, as of next year, both sides will now be paid six million kroner (£541,823) each, the Norwegian FA confirmed.

Norway’s male players agreed to take a wage cut to help achieve parity, with the £44,739 they previously received from commercial activities directed to the women’s team.

Prior to the new financial agreement, the women collectively earned £366,451 compared to the men’s £774,341– despite the fact the ladies have consistently achieved better results on the international stage.

The agreement was signed this week at the Norwegian Embassy in London by Norway’s men’s and women’s captains – Stefan Johansen and Maren Mjelde – and representatives of the Norwegian Football Association (NFF) and Norway’s players’ association (NISO).

norway-1.jpg
Johansen and Mjelde together after signing the agreement (Getty)

“I am proud to be a Norwegian football player,” Norway captain Maren Mjelde said in a statement.

Pal Bjerketvedt, NFF’s Secretary General, said: “It is very positive that Norway is a pioneer.

“At the same time, this is a recognition for women’s football in general, and it’s amazing to see how much this means to the players and what enormous attention the issue has gained internationally.

“Players in the women’s team are increasingly being used in commercial contexts.”

Mona Juul, Norway’s ambassador to London, hoped the deal would inspire other associations.

“The agreement that guarantees equal pay for national teams is historic and important for Norwegian football,” she said.

Norway.jpg
Norway’s female side have enjoyed greater success on the international side than the men’s (Getty)

“I hope that the agreement can also be internationally inspired and I am proud to host this opportunity.”

The agreement is made more notable by the fact the Norwegian FA, which put forward the proposal earlier this year, did not officially recognise women’s football until 1976.

Pal Bjerketvedt, NFF’s Secretary General, said: “It is very positive that Norway is a pioneer.

“At the same time, this is a recognition for women’s football in general, and it’s amazing to see how much this means to the players and what enormous attention the issue has gained

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s